About us

We are highly qualified retirees who, for more than 12 years, have been about helping ourselves and our readers in dealing with medical people and medical organisations, about finding the best people and organisations to deal with and avoiding those who may not be the best, and finding the best medical information in the whole wide world.

One of us has University degrees in Law, Arts and Divinity and practiced law in New South Wales for more than 30 years.

If we can help you in any way, we will.

If you contact us for any reason, it can be absolutely guaranteed that your identity and anything you tell us will be kept absolutely confidential – you can use a false name if you want to make sure.

And that under no circumstances will you ever be asked for money – we have enough money.

Email us at info@questionsmisc.info.

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A/Prof Andrew Brooks, Urologist – dealing with

We’ve put up so many posts on Brooks, which you are taken to if you use the WordPress search facility on the right on this page.

One of the things about him is that he NEVER answers emails, even those which he’s required by law to answer. When a complaint was made about this to the NSW Privacy Commissioner he advised that his email address was set up so that it weeded out emails from patients so that he didn’t get them – this when our technology advisers tell us that it’s not possible for email addresses to be set up in this way, and when his staff did respond to one, about the mechanics of paying his $3,200 fee for less than an hour’s work.

For a while he had an ordinary email address on his website – admin@andrewbrooks.com.au – and even after he took this down, it still worked for a while, although it’s now stopped working altogether.

And he still has an ordinary email address on the Sydney University’s website – andrew. brooks@sydney.edu.au – but he never responds to emails sent using this address. And one of the things we’ve learnt is that if people don’t even acknowledge emails sent to them using a particular email address within 14 days, that they will deny that they ever received them ALWAYS!

So all he has available to contact him is a fax number!!!!! In this day and age???? If any of our readers ever tells us that they have come across a person or organisation that can only be contacted by fax worthwhile dealing with, we’d be absolutely SHOCKED!!!!

BUT, of course, there’s always snail mail, which we haven’t tried before!!!! So this was sent to Brooks today, on 14 June, 2020, by the post, perhaps just for fun!

We’ll let you know if we get a response.

To us, as we keep saying over and over again, it’s so simple, the best people and organisations to deal with have an ordinary email address readily available and, when it’s used to seek help and information, high quality responses are received, and that those who can be only contacted by fax and/or snail mail are seldom worth bothering with – and if there are readers out there who haven’t realised this, we’re not sure what more we can say.

Email us at info@questionsmisc.info.

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Westmead Government hospital – dealing with

One of our readers reports that, to cut a long story short, after he’d had such a severe dizziness attack that he’d called for an ambulance and been taken to this hospital, he ended up a week later, (after he’d slept the dizziness off and been discharged early the next day, and going back and having a couple of extensive tests on his heart during the next 4 or 5 days,) getting verbal advice from one of the hospitals doctors, a Dr Aravinda Thiagalingham, in a 4 or 5 minute consultation, which he’s sure is absolute rubbish. But he can’t get a second opinion because, despite repeated requests being sent by snail mail and ordinary email to Dr Thiagalingham, he won’t put anything in writing.

To us, the main point about this is that it indicates that the top management in the hospital don’t care. When our reader complained, he received this.

(That it is mentioned that our reader was “kept waiting” is a reference to the fact that Dr Thiagalingham was two hours late for his appointment!!! which, of course, further raises the question as to why his advice wasn’t, at first at least, sent by email – the reader could have waited the two hours if he wanted further information.)

But the main point is how would Denniss know whether anything was “appropriate” or not when he doesn’t know what advice our reader was given?

The fact is that if Professor Dennis, or Health Care Complaints Commissioner Dawson, or Health Minister Hazzard, or, indeed, Premier Berejiklian, cared how patients in this major hospital got on, they would be insisting that their doctors put things in writing, which would make it easy for them to know what was going on. What was done about it would be the next question.

It reminds us of the fact that Peter Drucker, the famous management writer, was always saying that it often doesn’t matter whether those in top management DO anything, so long as those under them know that those in top management know. The way in which Westmead hospital operates, it would appear that those in it’s top management don’t have a clue as to what’s going on with those under them, and the doctors under them know that they don’t know – this when it would so easy for them to know so much if they insisted on their doctors putting things in writing.

Email us at info@questionsmisc.info.

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The NSW Health Care Complaints Commissioner in action 6

Further to this post – ten weeks of utter farce, in which the NSW Health Care Complaints Commission presumably received nearly 500 complaints from NSW people about NSW doctors, (on their own figures, they average receiving nearly 200 a month,) ten weeks in which not one NSW doctor was found to have provided inadequate care or attention to a patient, ten weeks in which nearly 500 complainants were told they had nothing to complain about, ten weeks in which 500 doctors had “the last laugh,” AND NOBODY CARES!!!!!!!!!!!!

We’ve sent SO many emails to Sue Dawson, the NSW Health Care Complaints Commissioner about it, and never got the slightest indication that she cares; and SO many emails to Brad Hazzard the NSW Minister for Health about it, and never got the slightest indication that he cares about it; and SO many emails to Ryan Park the NSW Shadow Minister for Health about it, and never got the slightest indication that he cares about it, and recently, emails to the seven Members of Parliament on the Joint Parliamentary Committee on the Health Care Complaints Commission about it, and not got any indication that any of them care.

And, as for Premier Berejiklian! We’ve never bothered trying to email her – if she was interested in feedback from the people, she’d have an ordinary email address, which, of course, she hasn’t. But presumably, if she cared, something would be being done about it – replacing Sue Dawson with someone who cared would be a good start.

We’ve also emailed various Journalists, and not got responses – presumably this is an issued that’s “too hot to handle” by mere journalists.

In summary, if we, the people, want to know who are the best doctors to help us with our health and welfare and who are perhaps not the best, the HCCC has never been of any help and, on present indications, never will be.

To make a comment, ask a question, or, to join our mailing lists, email us at info@questionsmisc.info.

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Consultations with doctors by videos and phones 2

Further to this post, in which it was reported that one of our readers claims to have received an email from the Castle Hill Medical Centre, a medical centre based in the Western Suburbs of Sydney, advising that it was now offering video conferences with it’s doctors, this letter was sent to it yesterday, on 30 Apr. 2020, using the email form on it’s website.

and that this response was received this morning.

This response was sent at 12.51 pm today, 1 May 2020.

To us, it will be nothing short of bizarre if we don’t get a high quality to response to this, within a reasonable time.

We’ll let you know if we get a reply.

To make a comment, ask a question, or, to join our mailing lists, email us at info@questionsmisc.info.

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Consultations with doctors by videos and phones 1

One of our readers has advised us that he has just, (on Thursday, 30 Apr. 2020,) received an email from the Castle Hill Medical Centre, a medical practice based in the Western Suburbs of Sydney, with this big headline.

and this photo.

How much is this a development of interest?

We intend to look into it in some detail, and to keep our readers advised.

Our reader advises that although he’s found in the past that the people at this practice don’t really respond to emails, this email was sent back almost immediately.

We’ll let you know if any response is received this time.

A 1 May 2020 update: This response was received at 10:57 this morning, using the ordinary email address, tsteep@castlemedical.com.au.

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The NSW Health Care Complaints Commissioner in action 5

Another more than 10 weeks, (from 8 Feb. 2020 to today, the 22 Apr. 2020,) during which Sue Dawson and her people in the NSW Health Care Complaints Commission received more than 450 complaints from us, the people, about Medical Practitioners, (on their own figures – they say they received 2,377 in 2018-2019,) not one was found guilty of providing inadequate treatment and/or care – not one!

Only one was found guilty of anything wrong – “inappropriate prescribing of opioids and other drugs.”

The other more than 449 were told, presumably, in one way or another, that they had nothing to complain about!

Just as well parliamentarians Gurmesh Singh, Joe McGirr, Lou Amato, Mark Pearson, Walt Secord, Kate Washington, and Leslie Williams, on at Joint Parliamentary Committee on the NSW Health Care Complaints Commission, were “breathing down their necks,” or else they might not have found even one! (We’re being sarcastic, of course!)

Goodness knows how Sue Dawson fills in her day!

We keep being reminded of the Albert Einstein saying.

To make a comment, ask a question, or, to join our mailing lists, email us at info@questionsmisc.info.

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Deaths from the Coronavirus 2

From the Sydney Morning Herald on 23 Apr. 2020 – showing 16 new cases in 2 days, (7 in NSW,) and 4 new deaths, (3 in NSW.)

The Sydney Morning Herald has been producing information and graphs each day on the coronavirus – these appeared just an hour or two ago, on 21 Apr. 2020.

Someone has suggested that if there are more people recovering from it each day than are contracting it, which may already be happening, that Australia could be free from it in the foreseeable future, which hopefully makes sense.

And, interestingly, these figures indicate that for every person who’s dying from it, more than 91 are recovering from it.

Let’s hope the Sydney Morning Herald is getting it’s facts and figures right.

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Email addresses on the University of Sydney’s website – do they work?

With lots of NSW doctors, if you Google their name, one of the results that come up is like this.

And, if you click on results like this, a page comes up which has on it an ordinary email address, like so.

How likely is it that emails sent using ordinary email addresses like these are actually received by the addressees? In the past we’ve contacted the University to clarify this, and the answers we’ve got haven’t exactly been clear cut.

Over the years, we’ve found that if we haven’t even received an acknowledgement of an email sent using an ordinary email address on a doctor’s own website, (or other people’s own website, for that matter,) within 14 days that ALMOST CERTAINLY the recipient is a crook or, at least, incredibly slack, and that it’s a CERTAINTY that, if need be,  they’ll say that they’re prepared to swear on a stack of Bibles that they never received it.

Dr Brooks is an interesting example. We’ve related before how, to avoid getting into trouble with the NSW Privacy Commissioner for not responding to emailed requests for copies of documents  which he was required to provide by law, he claimed that the ordinary email address on his website was set up so that it “weeded out” emails from patients so that he didn’t receive them. (Accepted by the Privacy Commissioner as a reasonable excuse, of course!) Over the years we’re aware of at least 30 emails being sent to him, and he’s responded to only one, with details on how to pay him his $3,200 fee for less than un hour’s work, which, of course, he wouldn’t have received if his claims about how the email address on his website was set up were true.

And all of these emails were also sent to the address on the University of Sydney website as shown above. So did he get them?

Today we’ve sent a couple of emails to the University of Sydney using email addresses that we knew were no longer current, and we’ve got responses like the one shown below – the implication, of course, being that, if an address was used that was still current, that it WOULD have been delivered.

Of course, if emails are sent using email addresses that are shown on the university’s website and it’s never indicated that they haven’t been delivered, and they aren’t delivered, it would be disappointing, to say the least – in fact, we would think it would be outrageous!!!

And, of course, if you use email addresses on doctors’ own websites you should know for sure that they worked. In this regard, Brooks has taken the ordinary email address that used to be on his website down, but it could still be used if you knew what it was, but now emails sent using to it are returned – so all you can use to contact him is a fax number, so primitive and last Century, and the address on the University of Sydney’s website, which, he simply refuses to acknowledge he’s received.

To us it’s so obvious that it’s better to use doctors who have ordinary email addresses you can use to communicate with them if necessary, and, other things being equal, it’s complete and utter madness to use doctors like Brooks.

We will continue our investigations!

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Modafinil, providing Mental Energy 7

One of our readers, who’s in his mid-80s, says he couldn’t live without the mental energy Modafinil gives him. He says that with mental energy, he feels like doing things – without it, he mainly sits or lies around doing nothing, and that as he gets older every hour that he fells like doing things is precious, as he has fewer and fewer of them.

Yet so few doctors seem to recommend it.

In particular he saw a Geriatician once, (Geriatricians specialise in helping the over 65s,) who, when he asked her about Modafinil, just dismissed it, saying, “Oh that’s for people who nod off,” when our reader says he’s never nodded off in his life.

He says he believes that it’s almost criminal that doctors are not suggesting to all but perhaps the very youngest of their patients that they give it a try – for even quite young patients, there may be times when they need extra mental energy. But to not be suggesting to older patients is a disgrace.

One thing he says, one has to be careful with it as the extra mental energy it gives you during the day can cause it to be harder for you to go to sleep at night, although this may not happen to younger people. And he says he’s found that you can’t take a full tablet every day – for years he took a full tablet every second day. But lately he’s settled on taking a half tablet every day, with a mild sleeping tablet at night. It’s a matter of what best suits each individual.

To make a comment, ask a question, or to join our mailing lists, email us at info@questionsmisc.info.

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